HATEFUL D.L. Hughley on CBS: Cops Love Mass Murderers More Than Black Motorists

CBS This Morning embraced the hate on Monday as co-host Gayle King talked to actor and radio host D.L. Hughley about race. The extremist Hughley smeared all police, insisting that they love mass murderers more than black motorists. King must agree with this because she never bothered to speak out or object to the comments. 

Promoting his new book Surrender, White People! Our Unconditional Terms for Peace, King gushed, “I love the title!” Hughley sneered, “I’ve seen cops more angry with a black motorist who asked them why they were pulled over than I do like a Dylann Roof who committed mass murder.” 

 

 

He then slimed all police officers as more comfortable with the evil mass killer Dylann Roof then they are with “a black motorist.” 

I’ve never seen a mass murderer, a white mass murderer being walked to a squad car with people, policemen trying to get at him and everybody’s trying to hold them back. I’ll see that when police officers —  when a black motorist asks why they’re pulled over, or “I know my rights.” They’re more angry about someone asking what they’re being pulled over for than someone who just murdered nine people. 

Now, King can argue that her guest was “just” a comedian. But Hughley has a history of hate. In 2009, he lost his CNN hosting job after saying Republicans “literally look like Nazi Germany.” In 2019, the actor/host appalled much of the country by saying it’s “hard to feel sorry” for shooting victims in pro-gun Texas. The same year, Hughley smeared African American conservatives, saying Republicans only pick “obedient dogs” like Herman Cain, Ben Carson and Clarence Thomas. 

King, of course, never mentioned any of this. Her silence must mean that’s how the network feels as well. 

This hateful propaganda was sponsored on CBS by Acura, Value City Furniture and Comcast. 

CBS This Morning
6/29/2020
8:41

GAYLE KING: Comedian and actor D.L. Hughley has been entertaining audiences for three decades now. One of the original kings of comedy, Hughley is also a New York Times bestselling author, thank you so much with a nationally syndicated radio show available in more than 60 markets, thank you very much on that, too. His new book is, I love the title, Surrender, White People! Our Unconditional Terms for Peace. D.L. Hughley joins us from his home in Los Angeles. Good morning, thank you for getting up so early with us. Listen, I read your book over the weekend, and I’m so — 

… 

KING: But this is the thing that got me, D.L. I found myself — I said in the beginning — laughing at things I thought I shouldn’t be laughing at. You say for instance when it comes to black people and getting arrests —  I really did —  you said in the media you can always tell what the suspect is when they use the words what? 

D.L. HUGHLEY: Yeah. When they say “Apprehended and in custody” you know it’s a white dude. 

KING: Why? 

HUGHLEY: When they say apprehended and — 

KING: Why? 

KING: Because black dudes are always shot. One is you’ll see him going to Burger King, the other is a yellow line with a tarp across them. It’s —  I can always tell. I always know exactly what —  and you know, whatever else is interesting, I have seen cops more angry with —  I’ve seen cops more angry with a black motorist who asked them why they were pulled over than I do like a Dylann Roof who committed mass murder. I’ve never seen a mass murderer, a white mass murderer being walked to a squad car with people, policemen trying to get at him and everybody’s trying to hold them back. I’ll see that when police officers —  when a black motorist asks why they’re pulled over, or “I know my rights.” They’re more angry about someone asking what they’re being pulled over for than someone who just murdered nine people. 

KING: Something else that was timely. You talk about racist image rye. We just had the whole conversation about Aunt Jemima, yet you write about it in your book. What’s your take on racist imagery? 

HUGHLEY: That America’s more comfortable with a black woman on a pancake box than on a $20 bill. I remember at one point they were talking about putting Andrew Jackson on the front of the 20, and Harriet Tubman on the back which is crazy because that’s a slave on the front and a slave owner on the back. So, even when black people finally make it to money, we’re still going to have a supervisor. It’s crazy. 

KING: Are you finding that more white people are seeking you out these days for advice or just want to have a conversation? 

HUGHLEY: I think that’s happening. That’s a phenomenon I’ve noticed a lot. I was home, you know, shortly after the uprisings. And then this older couple who —  they’ve been neighbors for 20 years. They came up like, we’re so sorry. “We didn’t know what was going on. We’re so sorry —  is there anything we can do?” I’ve been here 22 years, you could have done —  it would have been great 20 years ago. But you see there’s —  there is —  the interesting thing is that people for whatever reason were obtuse and maybe they obtuse or naive or maybe didn’t care. I think now people, like I said, are tuned into a frequency they weren’t before. 

KING: But don’t you think, D.L., the death — I know this is true, the death of George Floyd right before our eyes has many people thinking very differently these days. 

HUGHLEY: I think so. But that — you contrast with that, of course it was a horrible thing to watch. And I think it’s a video I can’t even watch now. But I think the interesting dichotomy in America is there are people appalled by what they saw on the video, by the brutality that was visited on that video. But those very people will fight to keep the monuments of men who did far worse to black people. There’s a statue to a black —  to a man in New York as we speak who performed surgery, open heart —  surgery on women with no anesthesia. Andrew Jackson did far worse, and yet they’re appalled by what happened in Minneapolis, and the image they saw. But fight for the image of men who did far worse to people.